Tag Archive: living


How to Lift Weights

For building Muscle Mass:

When you’re trying to build muscle mass, you have to find ways to stabilize your body so that you’re only working a select set of muscles at once.  You can think of this in a bench press exercise where your legs and core are minimally involved because they’re resting on a bench.  Your pushing muscles are the only muscles being stressed to a great extent.

This is the type of exercise you have to do if you want to gain muscle mass.  You have to use exercises where specific muscles are targeted.  Full-body exercises just don’t work as well for muscle growth. Continue reading

Lifting weights is a source of empowerment.
Photo credit to Larry Lyday.

Weight lifting is NOT just to look good!

That’s one of the biggest myths that float around the American health and fitness scene.  I’ve even heard trainers say it.

Weight lifting is far more about creating long-term enjoyment of life.  It’s a major player in preventing diseases like heart disease, obesity, diabetes, and osteoporosis.  It’s also a massive factor in how long you will be able to maintain your independence as you age.

Lastly, yes.  A strong physique is an attractive physique.  It’s a huge plus, but it’s not the main reason you should be lifting weights.  Your health and fitness are the main reasons you should be lifting. Continue reading

Maine Hiking

The concept of functional exercise came from a bunch of exercise physiologists and physical therapists who noticed the obvious.  They noticed that doing leg extensions in a machine didn’t help their patients walk again.  They noticed that a lot of what we do today in gyms doesn’t really help the body function in its natural environment and therefore doesn’t really help us much other than by gaining muscle mass.  There’s nothing wrong with gaining muscle mass, but if that’s all you do then your training is incomplete.

For my own story, I got to a point where I was deadlifting over 450lbs and only had about 8% bodyfat.  But when I went to play some recreational soccer, I found out that I couldn’t change direction well at all.  I was slow and uncoordinated.  This confused me because I was the strongest I had ever been.  Strength in the gym automatically means strength in real life, right? Continue reading

Apparently, power training is for everyone…. including 65 to 84 year-olds.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18245765

In the study, they trained older adults with power (high speed) training or with strength (high resistance) training.  The results after 24 weeks were that the power-trained adults out-performed the strength-trained adults.  While strength training helped, power training won out.

So, this study leads us to believe that some level of power/speed training is beneficial for anyone and everyone.  Just lower the weight some and do the exercise at as fast of a speed as you safely can.  Focus on speed rather than using higher weights.

This isn’t to negate the efficacy of strength training.  Other studies done on athletes have shown that doing both strength and power training together is what leads to the best results.  However, it is short-sighted to only do strength training or to only do power training unless there is some sort of injury that you need to protect.