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She can squat 240 and deadlift 330. Does she look bulky?

A while ago, I wrote Can You Be Skinny AND Fat?.  The article shows why weight loss without exercise only makes you fatter in the long-term.  It’s a difficult reality to come to grips with, but it is absolutely true.

Since it’s rather idiotic to point at something that’s wrong but never propose a solution, this is the beginning of the solution.  This article shows the better way.  It shows what can happen with intelligent fat loss.  Because, if you think about it, that’s what everyone wants.

We typically admire physiques that have at least some level of muscle.  We just don’t like the fat.  A figure model’s glutes don’t come from only calorie restriction.  They come from building up her glute muscles and then eating to lose the fat on top of the muscle.  That’s what the curve is.  Without the strong muscle underneath, there is no shapely curve.  There would only be a flat line between her lower back and legs.

Since I showed the math behind losing weight the wrong way, I want to show the math behind doing it the right way.  Also, I’m going to run the numbers for the person who just wrecked their metabolism by doing weight-loss the wrong way from the previous article.

I also have to add a little disclaimer.  This is if you keep up your workout and nutrition plan religiously.  It’s what research says is possible, but it’s not necessarily easy.  A more realistic write-up would include the ups and downs that come along with life (and the corresponding binges, late nights, and long work hours).  I can’t predict that stuff, though.  As a result, take this for what it is: A Best-Case Scenario.

 

Month 1 (After Restricting Calories Without Exercise)

Height:  5’4”
Weight:  165lbs
Bodyfat Percentage:  37%
Lean Body Mass:  104lbs
Fat Mass:  61lbs

Summary:  She went on a severely calorie-restricted diet without exercising.  (Just the result of the earlier article)

 

Month  3 (After Three Months of Diet and Exercise)
Height:  5’4”
Weight:  155lbs (10lb loss)
Bodyfat Percentage:  31%
Lean Body Mass:  107lbs (3lb gain)
Fat Mass:  48lbs (13lb loss)

Summary:  Since she has been lifting weights, she has gained a pound of muscle per month.  However, she’s also been losing a little less than a pound of weight per week (she lost ten pounds over twelve weeks).

 

Month 6 (After Six Months of Diet and Exercise)
Height:  5’4”
Weight:  145lbs (20lb loss from Month 1)
Bodyfat Percentage:  24%
Lean Body Mass:  110lbs (6lb gain from Month 1)
Fat Mass:  35lbs (26lb loss from Month 1)

Summary:  She’s still coming along.  She’s gaining a pound of muscle a month and losing a little less than a pound of weight a week.

 

Month 9 (After Nine Months of Diet and Exercise)
Height:  5’4”
Weight:  135lbs (30lb loss from Month 1)
Bodyfat Percentage:  16%
Lean Body Mass:  113lbs (9lb gain from Month 1)
Fat Mass:  22lbs (39lb loss from Month 1)

Summary:  She’s still coming along.  She’s gaining a pound of muscle a month and losing a little less than a pound of weight a week.

 

Month 12 (After A Year of Diet and Exercise)
Height:  5’4”
Weight:  135lbs (30lb loss from Month 1)
Bodyfat Percentage:  14%
Lean Body Mass:  116lbs (12lb gain from Month 1)
Fat Mass:  19lbs (42lb loss from Month 1)

Summary:   Notice in this last three-month period, she gained her 3lbs of muscle, but she balanced her total weight by losing three pounds of fat.  Pretty cool, eh?

 

She continued the trend with her weight training and minor diet changes.  Oh, and maybe the coolest part is that since she has been resistance training and gained 12lbs of muscle, she now has a metabolism that is 600 calories higher.  So, if she wants to sit down and eat a bag of chips, she can (not that I’m recommending it as a daily thing).

The results of weight loss with muscle gain are a far cry from weight loss with muscle loss.  In this example, her metabolism increased 600 calories.  In the other example, her metabolism decreased 1,000 calories (not to mention the fact that she was at 165lbs again with 37% body fat).

Ok.  The next article will be the application of how to do this.  Really, it’s not that hard.  It’s exercising three days a week and reducing calories by 250 to 500 per day.  The hard part is actually taking the step of committing to the plan.

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